Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Vulgate Bible’

From the recent David Brooks’ column in the New York Times (3 Jan 2013):

I don’t give myself high marks on suffering fools. I’m not rude to those I consider foolish, but I strenuously and lamentably evade them. But I do see people who handle fools well. Many members of the clergy do, as do many great teachers. In my experience, Midwesterners are more likely to treat fools well. Natural politicians do so, too. Joe Biden is effective because he loves humanity in all its shapes and sizes.

G. K. Chesterton had the best advice on suffering fools gladly. He put emphasis on the gladly. When you’re with fools, laugh with them and at them simultaneously: “An obvious instance is that of ordinary and happy marriage. A man and a woman cannot live together without having against each other a kind of everlasting joke. Each has discovered that the other is a fool, but a great fool. This largeness, this grossness and gorgeousness of folly is the thing which we all find about those with whom we are in intimate contact; and it is the one enduring basis of affection, and even of respect.”

Libenter enim suffertis insipientes cum sitis ipsi sapientes. (II Cor 11.19)

For you freely suffer the foolish, even though you yourself are wise. (Translation mine)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Igitur si conresurrexistis Christo quae sursum sunt quaerite ubi Christus est in dextera Dei sedens quae sursum sunt sapite non quae supra terram mortui enim estis et vita vestra abscondita est cum Christo in Deo. (Col 3:2, Vulg.)

Therefore, if you have been resurrected with Christ, seek then those things which are above where Christ is sitting at God’s right-hand; taste those things which are below the earth, not what is below the earth. For you are dead and your life… your life is hidden with Christ in God. (Translation mine)

My words and thoughts do both express this notion,
That Life hath with the sun a double motion
The first Is straight, and our diurnal friend,
The other Hid, and doth obliquely bend.
One life is wrapt In flesh, and tends to earth.
The other winds towards Him, whose happy birth
Taught me to live here so, That still one eye
Should aim and shoot at that which Is on high:
Quitting with daily labor all My pleasure,
To gain at harvest an eternal Treasure.

George Herbert, “Our life is hid with Christ in God” (1593–1633)

Read Full Post »

 

 

You, Lord God, calmed the winds and the waves, and brought rest to the Lake of Gennesaret, grant eternal rest to those who died in the wind and the waves, and bring calm to those mourn them now.

In nomine Domini nostri Iesu Christi. Amen.

[Frank Franklin II, “Breezy Point, Queens” (2012). Link here]

Dixit autem illis: ‘Ubi est fides vestra?’ Qui timentes mirati sunt ad invicem, dicentes: ‘Quis putas hic est? quia et ventis et mari imperat, et obediunt ei?’ [Lk 8.25]

He said to them, ‘Where is your faith?’ They were afraid and amazed, and said to one another, ‘Who then is this, that he commands even the winds and the water, and they obey him?’ [NRSV]

Read Full Post »

Et ecce unus accedens, ait illi: Magister bone, quid boni faciam ut habeam vitam æternam? Qui dixit ei: Quid me interrogas de bono? Unus est bonus, Deus. Si autem vis ad vitam ingredi, serva mandata. Dicit illi: Quæ? Jesus autem dixit: Non homicidium facies; non adulterabis; non facies furtum; non falsum testimonium dices; honora patrem tuum, et matrem tuam, et diliges proximum tuum sicut teipsum. Dicit illi adolescens: Omnia hæc custodivi a iuventute mea: quid adhuc mihi deest? Ait illi Jesus: Si vis perfectus esse, vade, vende quæ habes, et da pauperibus, et habebis thesaurum in cælo: et veni, sequere me. (Mt 19.16-21)

And behold one coming along said to Him, “Good Master, what good must I do to have eternal life? And He said to him, “Why are you asking me about what is good? God alone is good. Therefore, if you wish to enter into life, keep the commandments.” He said to Him, “Which?” Then Jesus answered him, “You shall not murder; you shall not be an adulterer; you shall not commit theft; you will not give a false testimony; honor your father and your mother, and care for your neighbor as if it were yourself.” The young man said to Him, “I have kept all these since my youth; what do I lack even still?” Jesus said to him, “If you wish to be complete, go, sell what you have and give it to the poor, and you will have treasure in Heaven; and come, follow me.” (Translation mine)

It is the commandments of God that compels us not to sin; it is the grace of God in Christ that frees us from the need of our possessions, allowing us to give them over to the poor, and to go and follow Him.

From tonight’s Vespers:

Because he has given freedom to the destitute who called to him,
to the poor, whom no-one will hear.
He will spare the poor and the needy,
he will keep their lives safe. (Ps 72)

Read Full Post »

Et accusabant eum summi sacerdotes in multis. Pilatus autem rursum interrogavit eum, dicens: Non respondes quidquam? Vide in quantis te accusant. Iesus autem amplius nihil respondit, ita ut miraretur Pilatus. (Mk 15.3-5)

And the high priests accused him of many charges. Pilate, moreover, asked him again, saying: “Why do you not answer? See how many charges they are accusing you of.” But Jesus all the more said nothing, and at this Pilate was astonished. (Translation mine)

Humans are given the remarkable gift of speech, reflecting that Trinitarian relationship between God the Father and the Word who proceeds. Because of this gift, we as God’s creatures are compeled to return the gift of speech back to our Creator, to render praise to Him who has given us the gift of speech.

Otherwise, we are to remain silent, lest we fall into sin.

Read Full Post »

Urbs fortitudinis nostrae Sion;
salvator ponetur in ea
murus et antemurale.
Aperite portas et ingrediatur gens iusta,
custodiens veritatem
vetus error abiit: servabis pacem;
pacem quia in te speravimus.
sperastis in Domino in saeculis aeternis;
in Domino Deo forti in perpetuum. (Isa 26.1b-4, Vulg.)

 

The city of our strength is Zion:
the Savior will erect in it the wall and rampart.
Throw open the city-gates
and let the just nation enter,
one who guards the truth.

The old transgression has passed away;
You will guard the peace;
a peace we have hoped for,
because peace is in You.

You have hoped in the Lord in ages eternal!
In the Lord God, steadfast forever! (Translation mine)

Ambrogio Lorenzetti, Effetti del Buon Governo in Città or “Effects of Good Government in the City” (c. 1338-40)

‘O fortunati, quorum iam moenia surgunt!’
Aeneas ait, et fastigia suspicit urbis. (Aen. I.437-438)

“Lucky are you, whose walls now rise!”
Cried Aeneas, as he surveyed the summits of the city. (Translation mine)

Read Full Post »

Scribantur haec in generatione altera,
et populus qui creabitur laudabit Dominum.
Quia prospexit de excelso sancto suo;
Dominus de caelo in terram aspexit:
ut audiret gemitus compeditorum;
solveret filios interemptorum:
ut annuntient in Sion nomen Domini,
et laudem eius in Jerusalem. (Ps 101.19-22, Vulg.)

 

Let this be written in the coming generation:
“and a people yet created shall praise the Lord:

because He has looked out from His lofty sanctuary;
from heaven the Lord has surveyed the earth:

to hear the cries of prisoners,
to free the children of the slain,

that they might declare the name of the Lord in Zion
and his praise in Jerusalem.” (Translation mine)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »