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Archive for April, 2009

After the sabbath, as the first day of the week was dawning, Mary Magdalene came with the other Mary to inspect the tomb. Suddenly there was a mighty earthquake, as the angel of the Lord descended from heaven. He came to the stone, rolled it back, and sat on it. In  appearance he resembled a flash of lightning while his garments were as dazzling as snow. The guards grew paralyzed with fear of him and fell down like dead men.

Then the angel spoke, addressing the women: “Do not be frightened. I know you are looking for Jesus the crucified, but he is not here. He has been raised, exactly as he promised. Come and see the place where he was laid. Then go quickly and tell his disciples: ‘He has been raised from the dead and now goes ahead of you to Galilee, where you will see him.’ That is the message I have for you.”

They hurried away from the tomb half-overjoyed, half-fearful, and ran to carry the good news to his disciples.

Suddenly, without warning, Jesus stood before them and said, “Peace!” The women came up and embraced his feet and did him homage. At this Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid! Go and carry the news to my brothers that they are to go to Galilee, where they will see me.” (28.1-10)

The Gospel of St. Matthew

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Behind the Wheel: Good manners are not suspended when you get behind the wheel of an automobile. A good driver is knowledgable, alert, cautious, and sober. A courteous driver is one who is sensitive to the needs and predicaments of other drivers and who does not react negatively to the aggressive rudeness of others. A good and courteous driver is always alert to and respectful of pedestrians, runners, bicyclists, and others who share the roads with motorists. A courteous driver avoids using the horn and keeps the volume of the stereo at a reasonable level, and ignores the rude behavior of others.

To Manners Born To Manners Bred: A Hip-pocket Guide to Etiquette for the Hampden–Sydney Man

[N.B. – Every incoming Hampden-Sydney freshman receives this “hip-pocket guide to etiquette” upon matriculation in the Fall.]

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The Words to Avoid: Do not let profanity become a natural part of your vocabulary, or you will find it difficult to avoid using it at inappropriate times. We all get mad; we swear at ourselves or our frustration or the stupidity of our own actions. We use the words because we know them, and we are too upset to think of any more elegant expression of how we feel. This is not desirable, but it is human and very different from peppering your everyday speech with expletives or using profanity to express surprise or emotion. Such speech does not make you sound tough, or clever, only vulgar.

To Manners Born To Manners Bred: A Hip-pocket Guide to Etiquette for the Hampden–Sydney Man

[N.B. – Every incoming Hampden-Sydney freshman receives this “hip-pocket guide to etiquette” upon matriculation in the Fall.]

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The last nine hours have been unquestionably the most exciting of my life. I can conceive nothing more sublimating than the strange peril and novelty of an adventure such as this. May God grant that we succeed! I ask not success for mere safety to my insignificant person, but for the sake of human knowledge and—for the vastness of the triumph. And yet the feat is only so evidently feasible that the sole wonder is why men have scrupled to attempt it before. One single gale such as now befriends us—let such a tempest whirl forward a balloon for four or five days (these gales often last longer) and the voyager will be easily borne, in that broad Atlantic becomes a mere lake. I am more struck, just now, with he supreme silence which reigns in the sea beneath us, notwithstanding its agitation, than with any other phenomenon presenting itself. The waters give up no voice to the heavens. The immense flaming ocean writhes and is tortured uncomplainingly. The mountainous surges suggest the idea of innumerable dumb gigantic fiends struggling in impotent agony. In a night such as is this to me, a mean lives—lives a whole century of ordinary life—nor would I forego this rapturous delight for that of a whole century of ordinary existence.

Edgar Allan Poe, The Balloon Hoax

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horace

pone me pigris ubi nulla campis
arbor aestiua recreatur aura,
quod latus mundi nebulae malusque
Iuppiter urget;

pone sub curru nimium propinqui
solis, in terra domibus negata :
dulce ridentem Lalagen amabo,
dulce loquentem.

Place me on the lifeless plains where no tree revives under the summer breeze, a region of the world o’er which brood mists and a gloomy sky ;

Set me beneath the chariot of the sun where it draws too near the earth, in a land denied for dwellings!  I will love my sweetly laughing, sweetly prattling Lalage.

Horace, Odes

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portmanteau

portmanteausPortmanteu, sb. 1584. [a. F.; see PORTE- and MANTEAU.] 1. A case or bag for carrying clothing and other necessaries when travelling; now, an oblang stiff leather case, which opens like a book, with hinges in the middle of the back. || 

2. A clothes-rack, an arrangement of pegs to hang clothes on 1727. 3. attrib., as in p. horse, etc.; p. word,  a word like those invented by Lewis Carroll made up of the blended sounds and combining the meaning of two distinct words (as slithy, meaning ‘lithe and slimy’).

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